Technology

Is Google Chrome developing a new monitoring program on YOU in secret?

GOOGLE is exploring a brand-new substitute for browser cookies, which track your online movements and interests. However, the US corporation has not offered a mechanism to determine if you are one of the millions of people included in this experiment. Fortunately, someone else has invented a tool to tell you whether you’re a Guinea Pig.

Google has vowed to ditch traditional third-party cookies to track users within its Chrome web browser. The move, designed to boost privacy, has been pretty controversial – with several other web browsers vocally opposing the upcoming change.

These can be beneficial. If you add products to a shopping cart, leave the site, and return to the same store, the items you’ve previously added will be there. That is only feasible because the website recognizes you and records what you did on your previous visit. You can also use Cookies to target advertisements based on your browsing history, interests, and other factors.

So, what does Google’s recent statement mean? Is the California-based firm preparing to quit tracking its customers?

Currently, cookies identify you when you visit a new website. These can be handy. If you add products to a shopping cart, go to another website, and return to the same store, the items you’ve previously added will still be there. That’s only feasible because the website recognizes you and remembers what you did on your previous visit—cookies to target advertisements based on your browsing history, hobbies, and other factors.

So, what does Google’s most recent announcement mean? Is the California-based corporation preparing to quit tracking its users?

The system will sidestep the privacy dangers of third-party cookies while also creating new ones. It may also worsen many of the worst non-privacy issues associated with behavioral marketing, such as discrimination and predatory targeting,” it warns.

Google is presently testing its FLoC substitute for cookies. However, it is not informing Chrome users whether they are involved in the test.

According to Google, the newest round of testing includes around 0.5 percent of its customers.

The system will sidestep the privacy dangers of third-party cookies while also creating new ones. It may also worsen many of the worst non-privacy issues associated with behavioral marketing, such as discrimination and predatory targeting,” it warns.

Google is presently testing its FLoC substitute for cookies. However, it is not informing Chrome users whether they are involved in the test.

According to Google, the newest round of testing includes around 0.5 percent of its customers.

The only method to evade the new monitoring technique, according to the EFF, is to use a different web browser. Brave, another popular alternative, has also indicated that it intends to discontinue its users’ new monitoring method.

Apple is putting itself at the frontline of the privacy battle, which is only getting started. The upcoming iOS 14.5 update for iPhone, which will in the coming weeks, will usher in a sea change in the user-tracking industry.

Apps that wish to save your data on iOS, like Google and Facebook, will now have to ask for permission first. Facebook has been quite outspoken about these conversation windows, which will plainly state what data the app is attempting to gather and how it may jeopardize its revenue model.

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